Masking up – How to make a fabric mask

Quite a number of people have asked my about how I made the fabric masks for our family. In late April, I dug out my trusty Singer sewing machine and joined a community sewing project run by my local council here in France.

After producing 100 masks for them from pre-cut materials to Lille University Hospital approved pattern, I reckoned I had learnt a new skill. So I made family ones from my materials box. I have a full suitcase of offcuts. 😉

Anyway, here are some guidelines that I developed. They’re not advice, but you you may find them helpful. There’s also a pdf version to download at the end.

——

Materials

Three layers are recommended.

Outer layer (1): I used a thick, close-woven soft furnishing fabric so I could be 100% sure the weave was tight. Yes, 400 thread Egyptian cotton sheeting would do the same, but you don’t want to cut up your best sheets!

The choice of fabric is yours; the trick is to hold the fabric up to sunlight. If you can see through it without too much trouble, it’s not tightly woven enough. Linen is no use for this reason.

Anything knitted is a no-no as it can stretch and open up the fabric which lets drops through.

Middle layer (2): Winter or horticultural fleece “non-woven (technically called spun bonded) polypropylene fleece”. Gardeners will know this is a thin membrane used to protect soft fruit and other delicate plants from harsh winter weather. It’s very light and not woven. It’s easily obtainable from garden centres or online.

Be warned: It comes in large sheets. Buy the smallest size you can get or club together with others. You only want a tiny quantity – 20 x 20cms for each mask.

Inner layer (3): something soft like cotton/poplin, ideally 100% cotton and again closely woven. Polycotton mix sheeting is okay – we do sleep on it much of the time. Avoid synthetic fabrics like nylon, acrylic, polyester, viscose; they’ll just make your skin hot and sweaty, and potentially blotchy.

 

Elastic
You’ll need  two 18cm lengths. Round elastic as on surgical masks is fine but can become uncomfortable after a while and it’s awkward to sew.

I prefer flat elastic – easier to sew and more comfortable.

 

 

Making your mask
Cut a paper/card/greaseproof paper pattern square of 20 cm x 20 cm. Fold it in four both straight (into 4 squares) and diagonally (into 4 triangles) to make sure you have a proper straight sided 20 cm square.

Unfold and flatten out.

Using your 20 cm paper square as a pattern, cut out one of each layer 1, 2, and 3.

Place layer 3 (inner) on top of layer 2 (fleece), then layer 1 (outer) on top of layer 3 with right side of fabric face down. Pin together.

Sew three layers together along two opposite sides with about a 0.75cm-1cm hem; these will be the top and bottom of the mask.

Next, place the ear elastics each side, sliding each end about at 0.75cm-1cm  in between layers 1 (outer) and 3 (inner) at points H in the diagram below.

 

Sew down the whole of one side, sewing the elastics in place at the corners. You may have to manoeuvre the material as it goes through the machine so you don’t catch the elastic in the wrong place.

Sew down the opposite site, sewing the elastics in place at the corners, but leave a 5cm gap in the middle of that side.

Tie all the loose ends off. You may also like to snip diagonally at the corner to get rid off excess fabric, but don’t cut into the sewn seams.

Using the gap left in one side, turn the whole mask out. Pin the gap opening together and oversew the whole square with a border of about 0.2 cm from the edge (right).

Pleating

Three or four pleats are usual. These held keep the mask tight on your face at the sides when wearing. From the top, fold 2-3 cm over  and pin. Repeat with the next 2-3 cm. See photo for finished effect. Once happy with the pleats, over sew down each side to fix pleats. Press with warm iron if you wish to (not compulsory!).

 

Washing

The recommendation is 60 minutes at 60 C, but I admit to soaking in hot tap water and washing machine liquid in a bowl for 30 minutes, then rinsing thoroughly, towel drying then drying in the sun or fresh air. This is not necessarily what you should do.

I do this after each use, e.g. a shopping trip or visit to doctor/library, etc., so would recommend making two masks per person.

And here’s the downloadable PDF including images

Stay safe and prosper!

 

When not sewing masks, Alison Morton is the author of Roma Nova thrillers –  INCEPTIO,  PERFIDITAS,  SUCCESSIO,  AURELIA,  INSURRECTIO  and RETALIO.  CARINA, a novella, and ROMA NOVA EXTRA, a collection of short stories, are now available.  Audiobooks are available for four of the series. NEXUS, an Aurelia Mitela novella, is now out.

Find out more about Roma Nova, its origins, stories and heroines… Download ‘Welcome to Roma Nova’, a FREE eBook, as a thank you gift when you sign up to Alison’s monthly email newsletter. You’ll also be first to know about Roma Nova news and book progress before everybody else, and take part in giveaways.

Writing things I forget, but need

Viglen 1 desktop

Do you use some your applications, programs or software occasionally and then forget how to do them?

I’ve used a computer since 1989.  Yes, there was personal computing then. We bought a Viglen Plus, 640K RAM and 30Mb hard drive storage and a 360K disk drive which took 5¼” floppy disks. Heady stuff! These were the days of working in DOS and using keyboard commands. WordStar, SuperCalc and DBase were the programs of the day. You memorised a hundred commands to drive even the basic functions.

I still use Control C and Control V for copying and pasting. Actually, on my Mac it’s Cmd C and Cmd V, but they’re the same mental process and finger movements. Cmd A is great for highlighting all text and the fabulous Cmd Z (presumably based on ‘zap’) for undoing the last action.

Next, we saw dropdown menus in DOS. How decadent! And then along came graphical interfaces, such as Windows. We became spoilt. But the old-fashioned DOS users then had the option of digging around in the innards of the operating system if there was a serious problem and we learnt to systemise and file information properly on ‘trees’.

Enough nostalgia! Back to amnesia…

When I go back to iMovie to make or amend a video, usually a book trailer, I have to re-familiarise myself with its arcane mysteries. I admit, iMovie10 was wonderfully flexible with myriad options and tweak possibilities, but then iMovie11 hit and it was a horrible surprise. Many of the options and tweaks had vanished, but it was still as un-intuitive as before. Still, I wrestled with it and eventually worked out how to work in the new restricted environment. Then I didn’t make a book trailer for a year. Cue a day of frustration re-learning the blasted program.

But MS Word gives me the most grief as Microsoft insists on changing familiar commands or buttons every time they update. Like many writers, I use the Review function as does my editor and countless editors before her. When you finished, you used to click ‘Final’ and hey presto, the mark-up area at the right side disappeared.

In the current version 16.37 for Mac, there is no ‘Final’ option.

Cue ‘O Fortuna’ from Carmina Burana…

 

Now, I’m used to computing after thirty years and am reasonably good at researching, but it took ages to find the appropriate information and instructions to get rid of that wretched right hand column for ever. Or maybe I’m just slowing up…

My teeth gnashed at this on the above linked help page:
“Important:
  The only way to remove tracked changes is to accept or reject them, and the only way to remove comments is to delete them. Choosing the No Markup view only temporarily hides changes and comments, and will show up again the next time someone opens the document.”

Er, Microsoft, at this stage when we’ve finished edits or addressed all the comments, the only thing we want to do is produce a nice clean document, or copy document, that doesn’t have the blasted review column, especially if it’s empty. So ‘Final’ is the simplest option for doing this in one go.

Perhaps I enjoy the apocalyptic lure of a ‘Final’ button, but I would have fewer visits to the dentist if computer software designers would listen to the common or garden user.

 

Alison Morton is the author of Roma Nova thrillers –  INCEPTIO,  PERFIDITAS,  SUCCESSIO,  AURELIA,  INSURRECTIO  and RETALIO.  CARINA, a novella, and ROMA NOVA EXTRA, a collection of short stories, are now available.  Audiobooks are available for four of the series. NEXUS, an Aurelia Mitela novella, is now out.

Find out more about Roma Nova, its origins, stories and heroines… Download ‘Welcome to Roma Nova’, a FREE eBook, as a thank you gift when you sign up to Alison’s monthly email newsletter. You’ll also be first to know about Roma Nova news and book progress before everybody else, and take part in giveaways.

To Zoom or not to Zoom?

Young woman making a videoconference call

Let’s face it, not seeing our friends, family and colleagues and not going to our favourite bar or pub, not being able to hug others or kiss them is a real pain. No more weekends away, in my case on a low-cost plane to the UK, no more work trips, let alone seeing my newborn grandchild.

Enter Zoom!

We’ve had Skype and FaceTime for a while but now there are MS Team and Facebook Rooms, plus many others I haven’t heard of. But the principle is the same – group chats with your mates, colleagues, activity groups and of course, your wider family.

It’s sheer pleasure interacting with somebody outside your immediate household and reassures you and them that we are still here. Jokes, experiences, both happy ad tragic, or just chit-chat are still out there for us to share. And seeing people is so much better than the bald talk of social media, even with images. I’ve been on many groups and chats and generally enjoyed every one.

However… (Just for a change from the usual ‘but’ 😉 )

It can get a little chaotic. No, actually very chaotic. Everybody is excited about meeting up, especially when it’s with friends and colleagues of equal status. We all pile in.

After a few minutes, one person seems to dominate the conversation and quieter group members tend to have little chance to say anything unless another respected member specifically asks them for their news or views. And everybody replies which means nobody hears much of what’s said. Then it settles down, but before long another wave comes along.

This is all perfectly natural, but sometimes you feel as if you’ve been at a village jumble sale scrabbling for the desired item.

Video conferencing (whatever the name) was really designed for business meetings where a formal hierarchy and systematic reporting order exists. Like any business meeting, there’s a chairman/woman/person who keeps order and ensures that views are heard, ideas discussed and stuff gets done.

In the military, there is voice procedure which is basically a similar system. Everybody has a place in the order of responding to the call initiator and an identifying number to demonstrate that order.

Don’t get me wrong. I LOVE connecting with others during this enforced isolation but we seem to have forgotten the usual ways of group talking. Would we talk over each other like this in a pub or over a group meal? I don’t think so. We’d take turns more. I say ‘more’ as we do overtalk a little in real life but mostly we wait for the other person to finish.

Whilst technology should be our servant, not our master, I think we need to work out how to adapt to its limitations. I’m not advocating talking by numbers, but a facilitator should be designated who can ensure everybody gets an equal look in and call order if it’s getting too raucous. This will lead to something resembling a civilised conversation between equals rather than the rather tumultuous free for all I sometimes leave with no breath and a ringing head.

I probably won’t get invited to any more chats now…

 

Alison Morton is the author of Roma Nova thrillers –  INCEPTIO,  PERFIDITAS,  SUCCESSIO,  AURELIA,  INSURRECTIO  and RETALIO.  CARINA, a novella, and ROMA NOVA EXTRA, a collection of short stories, are now available.  Audiobooks are available for four of the series. NEXUS, an Aurelia Mitela novella, is now out.

Find out more about Roma Nova, its origins, stories and heroines… Download ‘Welcome to Roma Nova’, a FREE eBook, as a thank you gift when you sign up to Alison’s monthly email newsletter. You’ll also be first to know about Roma Nova news and book progress before everybody else, and take part in giveaways.

Do writers live in permanent lockdown?

Writers spend much of their lives in lockdown. I don’t mean since March, but all the time; about 60-65% in my case.

But what really goes on in the head of that person hunched over a computer grunting and tapping away at their latest masterpiece? Are they dreaming up new plots, imagining engaging or repelling new characters, working fiendish traps into the narrative?

Could they be tasting the salt air as they surf the Californian waves, freezing their extremities off as they hack up the Alps behind Hannibal’s elephants or half-dozing as their water-taxi drifts through warm lagoons? Or maybe they’re just fantasising about chocolate or the latest car on Top Gear.

Probably some or none of this. And certainly not in the past few months when distraction has dominated.

Dealing with the rest of the world

In Real Life, or “Before” as we must call it now, writers could keep up a good act giving the impression they were paying attention. They’d smile at you even though their characters are running around in their head and the plot is unravelling. Now, with distancing and face masks, you really won’t know what they’re thinking.

That frown in the eyes and on their brows could be at the sight (please, not ‘site’!) of the grocer’s apostrophe for plurals, ‘less’ instead of ‘fewer’ and ‘your’ instead of ‘you’re’ in the local supermarket. Their mouths puckered as if they’ve eaten too many Twiglets, their eyes narrowed and all around would brace for a grammar lesson.

But now they’re 2 metres apart…

To go out or not?

The stricter provisions of lockdown ease considerably as we enter Phase 2 of “déconfinement” here in France. We’ve been able to go out without certificates, for any reason beyond the five exceptional ones and for more than an hour since 11 May. And out we went, to a beautiful village complete with 15th century castle to the north of us. Sadly, their wine shop was closed. 🙁

But you couldn’t go more than 100 km from home or across the French frontier unless you were one of a specific group of workers. But I was able to get a haircut – glorious! But a bit weird having your hair washed when wearing a mask…

From tomorrow, 2 June, we in the green zone can go further than 100km and – relief of all reliefs – we can go to a restaurant or bar and spend the whole day at many beaches. No longer will we need to book an appointment at the tip. (You should see our cardboard mountain!) Plus we can actually meet friends! Well, a few of them.

And here’s the fix… Nobody knows several days beforehand – up to 14 days – that they have Covid19. And then there are the asymptomatic carriers. Even if your friends don’t have the virus, you don’t know who they’ve they been interacting with. We humans are such social animals that we hardly took account of the number of the people we met everyday in “Before” life – the postwoman, cashiers, neighbours, shop assistants, book group, coffee morning, doctor’s receptionist, garden centre staff and just people in the street.

Now, each could be a deadly disease carrier. Masks are de rigeur here and compulsory in most shops. A bare face in a supermarket is frowned on, at least in my small town. Handshaking and kissing just don’t happen. This is extremely strange in touchy-feely France and it was considered a social gaffe of large proportions if you didn’t greet people in either way.

Strict lockdown has worked here; daily death counts are now consistently below three figures. But the authorities will re-impose lockdown if this new relaxation leads to a surge in cases.

The Trait d’Union

So what is a writer to do?

I intend to go and eat lunch in a restaurant next week, if they’re open. My favourite one has been doing takeaways, but nothing beats sitting down and somebody else doing it for you. Plus I’d like to support them; solidarity is a very important value in France.

I shall contact a few chosen friends and we’ll sit outside over a glass of wine.

As Edouard Philippe, the French prime minster, said the other day, “Be meticulous, but not fearful. Please continue to exercise common sense and respect these barrier measures. We don’t want a resurgence.” (Full details here, in case you have insomnia.)

But I’ll still be spending 60% of my time in lockdown – writer’s lockdown.

 

Alison Morton is the author of Roma Nova thrillers –  INCEPTIO,  PERFIDITAS,  SUCCESSIO,  AURELIA,  INSURRECTIO  and RETALIO.  CARINA, a novella, and ROMA NOVA EXTRA, a collection of short stories, are now available.  Audiobooks are available for four of the series. NEXUS, an Aurelia Mitela novella, is now out.

Find out more about Roma Nova, its origins, stories and heroines… Download ‘Welcome to Roma Nova’, a FREE eBook, as a thank you gift when you sign up to Alison’s monthly email newsletter. You’ll also be first to know about Roma Nova news and book progress before everybody else, and take part in giveaways.

Ever wondered where dust comes from?

Inspired by a really bad find when I was replacing my old open bookcases with lovely new closed-back ones…

Kicking up a Dust

‘Oh, do come on! You’re messing about like there’s no tomorrow.’

‘Well, there isn’t.’

Bevli rolled her eyes.

‘It’s a saying, alright? she retorted.

‘Why do you say it then? You sound like one of the Big Ones.’

‘Now look here, Shaz—’

‘I’m Staz. She’s Shaz,’ the younger one pointed to an even smaller figure who was gyrating round the kitchen.

‘Well, you look the same to me.’

Staz drew himself up to his full eight-millimetre height.

‘I’m a him, she’s a her,’ he said, his voice full of offence. ‘And we work as a team. We’ve been doing this for two hundred years and know what we’re doing.’ To reinforce his point, he extended a skinny arm and threw a handful of tiny specks up into the air. They curved in a cloud with a tail, then separated, drifting down and scattering over the red tile floor. ‘See?’ he said.

‘Alright, alright,’ Bevli conceded. ‘You scatter well. But we’d better get on. We have five more rooms to do before sunrise.’

Bevli formed up her little troop of dustites into a loose group and ushered it towards the main living room. She sighed. This was a bigger house than their previous one and she’d had to accept some new members after the Great Disaster. And they’d had to make a long journey to get here. It had taken five of the Big Ones’ years. The major had assured her that it would be an easy billet and he trusted her to weld her group into a cohesive force. Their work was essential to the universe and absolutely essential to keep the Big Ones on their toes.

Bevli sighed again. All well and good for him to say that but these latest Big Ones had such massive weapons of strength that nobody had seen before. Her teams had learnt to run and hide from the big sucker that had taken all the eastern cohorts that time several decades ago. Now they cleared their personnel from any area a good hour before any of the Big Ones arrived. The next night they worked extra hard to leave a double coating.

‘Where shall we start, please, Miss Bevli?’ Shaz asked. Bevli peered at the little figure and thought that as the dustite was polite it had to be Shaz rather than the stroppy Staz. Bevli studied the room. It wasn’t in too bad a state. A film of dust covered most wood surfaces including the crossbars on the dining table and chairs by the window.

‘You hop up onto the window sills in the bay and start there. If you get a bit on the curtains it will be a bonus. They’re velvet and dust should stick nicely. Bit awkward they’re still open, but do your best.’

Shaz trotted off, with a hop and a skip on the way. Bevli thought she heard her humming a tune. Oh, well, nothing like a happy worker. And the moonlight flooding through the windows made such a difference. You could see exactly where to lay the dust and watch it sparkle as it fell. Staz was concentrating on the mantelpiece then jumped onto the television. Two others were tackling an old-fashioned sideboard. Bevli smiled to herself. Maybe the major was right. No Big One had lived here for a whole year since the last one had died so their dust was hardly disturbed as the days passed.

‘Scuse me, Bevli, but there’s a delegation from the spiders wants to talk to the dustite-in-charge.’ Hadlit, her deputy, broke into her nightdreaming.

‘Oh. Thanks, Hadlit. I hope it’s not one of those giant ones again. Frightened the life out of me.’

‘Yeah, something ten times bigger than you don’t make you very comfortable.’ He grinned at her. ‘But that last one turned out to be a dead softie, lisp an’ all.’

‘I know. Well, wheel him in.’

The arachnid was small, brown, with hair thin legs. She – Bevli was sure it was a she – danced towards them as if on tip-toe.

‘Greetings,’ the spider trilled and blinked.

‘Hello,’ replied Bevli, trying not to show how disconcerted she was by such a show of six eyes reflecting moonlight. ‘What can I do for you?’

‘There’s a few of us would like to move in, spin some webs and  hang out here. We wondered if you’d be okay with that?’

‘Thought you lot didn’t live in groups,’ Hadlit said and glanced at Bevli.

‘Sometimes we do, sometimes we don’t,’ came the enigmatic answer.

‘As long as you don’t get in our way,’ Bevli said, not knowing which eye to look at.

‘Nah, you won’t know we’re here,’ the little brown spider said and shrugged all eight shoulders. She waved a leg in the air. ‘See ya, then.’ She turned and scuttled off leaving Bevli staring after her.

‘Blimey, she’s an odd one,’ Hadlit said. ‘They’re usually a lot snottier than that.’

‘Perhaps they’re a rebel collective or something,’ Bevli answered. ‘Keep an eye on them, please, Hadlit and let me know if anything disturbing happens.’

He nodded and marched off in the direction of the staircase taking another two dustites with him. Bevli looked round and spotted Staz lying down on the tabletop.

‘Shift yourself, young dustite,’ she said. ‘There’s all upstairs to do. No time to lie down on the job.’

‘But nobody’s been here to clean. Why should we keep laying dust on top of what’s there?’

‘First, because I tell you to. Second, the thicker the layer the better.’

‘But no Big One will come and live here again.’ Staz half-closed his eyes and gave her a challenging look. ‘They’re all dying.’

‘Oh, you’re now on the inside circle of news, are you?’ Bevli couldn’t keep the sarcasm out of her voice. ‘We made that mistake in 1348. They didn’t all die out. Only about a third of them. And look how many of them there were at the end of the second millennium!’

Staz sat up.

‘Was you there? In the Black Death?’

‘I was very young then, barely out of the shell,’ Bevli replied. ‘My dad said they knew better in the Roman times with the Antonine plagues. He and his mates had a great time, he used to say.’

‘Respect,’ Staz said. He glanced at her, then jumped down. ‘I’ll go and start upstairs.’

Bevli groaned inwardly. The young ones were so naive.

***

Rattling. A tinkle of glass. Bevli sat up abruptly in her corner behind the tall clock in the hallway. The sound of the door opening – the front door. She peered out from under the plinth of the tall clock. The thump of boots. Great dust motes in the sky! Big Ones. Boots, smallish feet, and a second pair half the size. It was a female and a youngling. The boots stayed still then after a minute, moved forward. Bevli shifted to the side of the clock plinth.

Clouds! They’d left footprints across the parquet flooring, crushing the layer of dust so carefully laid by her team. She went to follow them when an intense beam of sunlight shot through the hole left by the broken pane in the front door.

Bevli dived back under the safety of the clock plinth. She trembled. That was a near one. She was always warning inexperienced dustites about the sunlight burning them to a crisp and had tragically seen it happen to others. Now she’d been almost caught herself like a beginner. Idiot! She’d have to leave the Big Ones to wreak havoc now and they’d all have to work twice as hard overnight.

Bevli roused herself as soon as it was dark and went on a scouting trip. Her heart sank. The hallway and stairs had been swept, the youngling’s room was clean and the kitchen floor gleaming. Curse the female Big One. Well, she’d soon find out that dust could not be defeated. They’d been scattering for over a million years and they’d do it for the next million.

‘Bad is it?’ Hadlit. His voice was sympathetic. He must have realised how frustrated she was.

‘Not tragic. But we’ll have to look sharp. Can you get three of the agile ones to find any hair the Big Ones have dropped so we can make some really substantial dust-bunnies?’

Hadlit chuckled. ‘Going for the heavy stuff, eh?’

They worked tirelessly throughout the night, adding extra layers on the bookcases and sideboard. Exhausted herself, Bevli congratulated the wilting troop and sent them off to a well-deserved rest. The next night they had to do the same.

For Bevli, it became a battle of wills.

***

A week later, Bevli woke at the same time and went to check the cleaning devastation in the kitchen. She slipped through the gap under the door, but stopped when she saw the female Big One sitting at the little table. Strange – the woman was normally in bed by now. But she sat there, head in her hands, sobbing. Her tears were falling onto the oilcloth covering the table. Bevli thought a dustite would be stunned and then drown in one of those great lumps of water. But the Big One’s shoulders were jerking up and down in time with the tears. Bevli couldn’t remember such open distress for a long, long time.

‘Oh, God,’ sobbed the woman. ‘Why did we come here? I thought me and Jim would find a place to be safe. But it’s a bloody rubbish tip.’ She stood up  and fetched herself a glass of water. Bevli stretched her neck and looked up to see tears streaming down the woman’s face. Poor thing. The major said a lot of the Big Ones were fleeing from a plague and taking over empty houses. This female  must be one of them. It was a solid house and plenty of room for her and the youngling. So why was she so upset?

‘I’m so tired of running. If only I could get this place clean. God knows how it gets so dusty each night.’

She sat down at the table again and started to cry again, but more softly. The kitchen door swished open, knocking Bevli off her feet. The youngling stood in the doorway. His eyes were gummy and half-closed.

‘Mum? Where were you? Why are you crying?’

‘Oh, Jim.’ She pulled herself up and hugged him. Bevli could see the child’s white face. Could do with a good meal, she thought. She watched as he clambered up on to the mother’s lap and laid his head on her chest.

‘Don’t cry, Mum. I’ll help, Mum.’

‘You can’t, Jim. You must rest.’

‘What are we going to do, then? You said we wouldn’t go travelling no more.’

‘I don’t know. Perhaps it would have been better if we’d died like Dad.’

Bevli watched as they both wept. Great motes, they were in a right state, this pair. Needed a bit of perking up. She was thinking so hard that she hardly noticed Hadlit arrive at her side.

‘You alright, Bevli?’

‘Oh, hello ,Hadlit. Just watching the Big Ones. I think we have to do something for them.’

‘Have you fallen over and hit your head?

‘No, I’m fine, but—’

‘What?’ His eyes narrowed. ‘You’re not going soft, are you? Our job is to keep them busy and out of as much mischief as we can. We wouldn’t exist otherwise.’

She batted the back of her hand against him, but lightly.

‘I know that, you daft thing. But suppose, just for once, we didn’t scatter? Would the world really end?’

 

(Originally written for Helen Hollick’s blog series Ten Minute Tales)

Alison Morton is the author of Roma Nova thrillers –  INCEPTIO,  PERFIDITAS,  SUCCESSIO,  AURELIA,  INSURRECTIO  and RETALIO.  CARINA, a novella, and ROMA NOVA EXTRA, a collection of short stories, are now available.  Audiobooks are available for four of the series. NEXUS, an Aurelia Mitela novella, is now out.

Find out more about Roma Nova, its origins, stories and heroines… Download ‘Welcome to Roma Nova’, a FREE eBook, as a thank you gift when you sign up to Alison’s monthly email newsletter. You’ll also be first to know about Roma Nova news and book progress before everybody else, and take part in giveaways.