How book bloggers help authors – 10 Dos and Don'ts

Bookbloggers read, review and promote books in their spare time. They don’t get paid. They love reading and want to share that joy with others.

Delving into a new world, meeting enthralling characters, being chilled or thrilled, rooting for the protagonist, biting their fingers off, never mind the fingernails, or sighing with pleasure or regret at the story’s conclusion – we all do that as readers. But bookbloggers  go and write their impressions and produce thoughtful reviews, some of them every day, others more than once a day. Next, they post the review on their blogs, to Amazon or other retailer, Goodreads then Tweet and post about it on Facebook and Instagram.

If you’ve written a book review yourself, you know it takes time. Most readers, for perfectly good reasons, never get round to writing them even for the books they love. Our bookbloggers do, consistently and continuously.

Let’s stamp on one myth of fake news

These generous people don’t get paid. Well, the reputable ones don’t. Yes, there are organisations who charge an admin fee or an express premium; these are a whole different thing. Then there are the sharks who blatantly charge for giving a 5-star review. Do not go there. Moving on…

The benefit for readers

A good book blogger will have a following which appreciates their dedication. These followers will be able to find out what to read next, what’s new, what’s not-so-new but so damn good you shouldn’t waste any more time in getting your hands on it. Bloggers’ thoughts may be subjective, but they are usually fair and honest thus giving their audience insight into books they might be considering buying. Today, bloggers review books published via any route and in different formats such as ebook and audio as well as paperback so readers are offered opinions on an ever widening choice of books.

Benefits for authors 

Your book gets exposure to new audiences and if you’re a new author, you are introduced to the book market as well. It costs nothing except a little time and perhaps a book to give away in a prize draw. You may well gain reviews (and quotes) for your book. Although not the primary objective of a guest spot/review, you may nevertheless get sales. The golden advantage is that bookblogger audiences are automatically tuned in to wanting to know about books, i.e. a semi-captive market.

A typical blogger review

Back to our volunteer bloggers…

Some cover specific themes or genres such as historical, romance scifi/fantasy or crime; others have preferred types of books such as clean, steamy or non-violent. Some only review non-fiction. Do check this when thinking of approaching a blogger as this will save your time and theirs.

A few author dos and dont’s

  1. Check the blogger’s site to see if your book is relevant to their audience as well as the blogger’s taste. Read a few of the posts and comment or at least ‘Like’ them.
  2. Write a nice, but succinct email with a hook line, the blurb and possibly a couple of things about your publishing history. Most importantly, address the blogger by name. Apart from being unprofessional, it’s bloody rude to write ‘Dear Blogger’.
  3. Do not send the book until asked to, even an ebook. Also rude, as they get flooded out.
  4. If requested, send a good quality (hi res but not enormous) author photo, succinct bio, social media and buying links, book blurb and cover image in good time.
  5. Do not chase. I know it seems impolite, but it’s accepted now that if they don’t reply, it means ‘no thanks’.
  6. Remember they are not obliged to read your fabulous tome.
  7. Genuine bloggers try to be diplomatic and kind in their reviews, but be prepared for a few that are not completely raving about your book. Honesty is a hallmark of a good blogger.
  8. Unless there is a blatant/glaring and factual error, don’t challenge the review. It’s their subjective opinion. If you feel there is really something wrong, send a polite, unemotional private email explaining the inaccuracy. Otherwise, just move on.
  9. And thank them in the comments. Most bloggers will tell you when they are going to post the review so you should go back and check for their readers’ comments and questions.
  10. Post on your own social media with the URL to the reviewer’s original post. It’s not only good manners as they are making an effort for you, but it may also ease the way when you want to send them another book to review.

Be nice!

This was said to me many years ago by a marketing guru and it’s stood me in good stead.  Bookbloggers don’t always feel appreciated by authors, which is self-defeating on the part of authors. Interacting with bookbloggers is all about the relationship.

Making friends with bookbloggers means not only being part of the book and publishing ecosystem, but also has the reward of being in the company of people who like nothing better than to be absorbed by and discuss every kind of book you can imagine.

 

Alison Morton is the author of Roma Nova thrillers –  INCEPTIO, CARINA (novella), PERFIDITAS, SUCCESSIO,  AURELIA, NEXUS (novella), INSURRECTIO  and RETALIO,  and ROMA NOVA EXTRA, a collection of short stories.  Audiobooks are available for four of the series.

Find out more about Roma Nova, its origins, stories and heroines… Download ‘Welcome to Alison Morton’s Thriller Worlds’, a FREE eBook, as a thank you gift when you sign up to Alison’s monthly email newsletter. You’ll also be among the first to know about news and book progress before everybody else, and take part in giveaways.

2020 – Books I read and enjoyed

This is not a beauty contest or a selection. The list below contains just books I’ve read this year because I wanted to. Some made me catch my breath, others made me weep with joy or sorrow and others appalled me. But they all enthralled me.

I’m not mentioning those I read or part-read and didn’t enjoy – that’s not fair to the authors concerned as I’m probably not their ideal reader.

I’m a fussy reader. I use Amazon’s ‘Send a free sample’ service mercilessly especially if it’s an author new to me. But I have discovered some real gems that way.

Oh, and I’ve read a few non-fiction for research – probably of interest for the history nerds. 😉

Fiction in (very) roughly chronological order backwards:
The Death Game, Chris Longmuir
Britannia’s Morass, Antoine Vanner
The Soft Touch of Angels, Anna Belfrage
All Souls’ Day, J J Marsh
House of Spies, Daniel Silva
The Other Woman, Daniel Silva
The Price of Silence, Nikki Coplestone
House of Shadows, Nicola Cornick
Kindred, Octavia E Butler (Re-read)
Criminal Shorts, UKCBK anthology
The Grove of Caesars, Lindsey Davis
The House of Vestals, Steven Saylor
Legionary, Gordon Doherty
Hotel Sacher, Rodica Doehnert & Alison Layland
A Painter in Penang, Clare Flynn
His Castilian Hawk, Anna Belfrage
A Capitol Death, Lindsey Davis
The Island Affair, Helena Halme
Antonius: Son of Rome, Brook Allen
Orfeia, Joanne Harris
The Potential for Love, Catherine Kullmann
Love Lost in Time, Cathie Dunn
The Germanicus Mosaic, Rosemary Rowe
Doorways to the Past, Vanessa Couchman, Sue Barnard, Cathie Dunn, Nancy Jardine, Jennifer C. Wilson
The Secret of the Chateau, Kathleen McGurl
Imperial Governor, George Shipway
Echoes of the Storm, Charlene Newcomb
At the Stroke of 9 o’ Clock, Jane Davis
A Sister’s Song, Molly Green
The Gamekeeper’s Wife, Clare Flynn
Counterpoint: The King’s Cavalier, Elizabeth St.John
Odd Numbers, J J Marsh
The Eagle of the Ninth, Rosemary Sutcliff
The Lantern Bearers, Rosemary Sutcliff
The Silver Branch, Rosemary Sutcliff
Augustine, Vanessa Couchman
The Girl from Oto, Amy Maroney
Fortune’s Child, James Conroyd Martin
Hiding from the Light, Barbara Erskine
Scourge of Rome, Douglas Jackson
Saviour of Rome, Douglas Jackson
The Green Ribbons, Clare Flynn
Notes from Lost, Cathy Hartigan
Echoes of the Runes, Christina Courtenay
The Stationmaster’s Daughter, Kathleen McGurl
The Power, Naomi Alderman
One Sixth of a Gill, Jean Gill
The End of Worlds, T E Shepherd
Secrets at St Brides, Debbie Young
A Sister’s Courage, Molly Green
The Blue, Nancy Bilyeau
The Phoenix of Florence, Philip Kazan
Jennings Goes To School, Anthony Buckeridge
Making History, Stephen Fry
The Other Side of Ordinary, Ines Row
The Passage, Irina Shapiro
A Shape on the Air, Julia Ibbotson
Blossom on the Thorn, Loretta Livingstone

 

Non-fiction
Barbarian Migrations and the Roman West 376-568, Guy Halsall
Roman Mythology: A Traveller’s Guide from Troy to Tivoli, David Stuttard
Women of Power in Anglo-Saxon England, Annie Whitehead
Mazzini, Denis Mack Smith
Noricum, Geza Alfoldy
The World of Late Antiquity AD 150-750, Peter Brown
The Fall of Rome and the End of Civilisation, Bryan Ward-Perkins
Romano-Byzantine Armies 4th-9th Centuries, David Nicolle

 

Alison Morton is the author of Roma Nova thrillers –  INCEPTIO, CARINA (novella), PERFIDITAS, SUCCESSIO,  AURELIA, NEXUS (novella), INSURRECTIO  and RETALIO,  and ROMA NOVA EXTRA, a collection of short stories.  Audiobooks are available for four of the series.

Find out more about Roma Nova, its origins, stories and heroines… Download ‘Welcome to Alison Morton’s Thriller Worlds’, a FREE eBook, as a thank you gift when you sign up to Alison’s monthly email newsletter. You’ll also be among the first to know about news and book progress before everybody else, and take part in giveaways.

Antoine Vanner: Writing about a female protagonist – a challenge for a male novelist?

I’m delighted to welcome back Antoine Vanner, creator of the Dawlish Chronicles series featuring Royal Navy officer Nicholas Dawlish (1845-1918) and his wife Florence (1855-1946). Nine volumes have been published to date and I’m looking forward to reading more!

Antoine’s own adventurous life, his knowledge of human nature, his passion for nineteenth-century history and understanding of what was the cutting-edge technology of that time make him the ideal chronicler of the life of Royal Navy officer Nicholas Dawlish. After many years in international business, Antoine has settled in Britain and continues to travel extensively on a private basis.

Over to Antoine to explain how he faced up to the challenge!

The Dawlish Chronicles series feature Royal Navy officer Nicholas Dawlish and his wife Florence.  Except in the first chronologically, Britannia’s Innocent, Florence is either a key player in the plot or an inspiration for her husband when he is seeing action abroad. He’s a driven and “earnest” character with a strong tendency to turn inward and without Florence he may well lapse into depression and pessimism. His successful career depends therefore on her love, loyalty, cheerfulness and courage. She is the great love of his life and he is hers. He risks social ostracism – and his career – by marrying her, despite her having been once in domestic service.

Florence had been a major player in my earlier books, with Nicholas as protagonist. In the process she became very real to me. I knew her character, strengths and weaknesses, and even identified their house in the Portsmouth suburb of Southsea. By now however she was demanding to have a book to herself – and so I wrote Britannia’s Amazon, which details her adventures in Britain at the same time as her husband is in Korea in Britannia’s Spartan. She planned to fill the months of separation with welfare work for seamen’s families. Witnessing the abduction of a young girl that ended that, bringing Florence into brutal contact with Victorian society’s squalid underside. And so the story takes off, leading her into a maelstrom of corruption and violence. The enemies she faces are merciless and vicious, their identities protected by guile, power and influence. Somehow, with unexpected allies, she prevails.

Now, in the latest of the series, Britannia’s Morass, Florence is again the protagonist, her adventures running contemporaneously with those of her husband in Britannia’s Gamble. It’s 1885 and the suicide of a widow troubles Florence. Left wealthy by her husband, this lady died a pauper, beggared within a few months, how and by whom, nobody knows. Lacking close family, she’ll soon be forgotten. But not by Florence. Someone was responsible and there must be retribution. But she makes a single blunder, one that leads her into an ever-deepening morass of betrayal, blackmail and espionage, in which she herself becomes a pawn . . .

Flora Shaw

So what’s the challenge for a male writer who presents a novel’s action through the eyes of a Victorian woman?
Portraying intelligence, courage and resolution is less a problem than reflecting the restrictions that late 19th century society placed on women. I don’t see Florence as a feisty 21st Century woman in re-enactor’s costume, but rather like real women of her own time who pushed the boundaries, steadily, resolutely and successfully. She has something of Flora Shaw (1852-1929), later Lady Lugard, who was Colonial Editor for The Times in the 1880s, investigated colonial abuses and later named Nigeria. Florence has the bloody-minded courage of the wonderful Lady Florence Baker (1841-1916), bought by her husband Sir Samuel Baker when a slave in Romania, and who helped him explore the Upper Nile. There are also traces in Florence of the heroic explorer Mary Kingsley (1862-1900) and of world-traveller Isabella Bird (1831-1904), whose account of Korea was an essential reference when I wrote Britannia’s Spartan. Equally inspiring was Mary Slessor (1848-1915), a Dundee jute-mill worker who went to S.E. Nigeria as a missionary, learned Efik, the local language, and was appointed a vice-consul and magistrate. She is still honoured in Nigeria today, if largely forgotten in Britain.

The practical aspects of a Victorian woman’s life must also be considered
Though needing to watch her outgoings, Florence prefers expensive hansom cabs to using the London Underground Railway in which smuts from the steam locomotives will spoil her hair. Long skirts hinder her as a woman of action, though she’s glad of styles that provide long hat-pins as weapons of last resort.  Self-educated, and culture-hungry, her servant-class origins are still held against her by many. Her cook and housemaid are responsibilities as well as supports. When travelling alone by train she can avail of “ladies-only” compartments and waiting rooms since unwelcome male attention can be a problem. Circumspection is essential when meeting men alone on business. She uses telegrams as the internet of the time and she’s becoming familiar with “telephone machines”.

But for the smallest details a male writer must fall back on female advice – family, friends or other writers who can review the first draft to comment on matters of perception, priorities, clothing and cosmetics. And cosmetics play a major role in Britannia’s Morass

And is it easy? No – but it’s worth it as I’m much in love with Florence!

———-

Connect with Antoine
Website: https://dawlishchronicles.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AntoineVanner @AntoineVanner
Author Page: https://amzn.to/2JwYKVX

About Britannia’s Morass

It’s 1884 and, in Nicholas’s absence, Florence Dawlish faces months of worry about him. She’ll cope by immersing herself, as she’s done before, in welfare work for Royal Navy seamen and their families at Portsmouth. The suicide of a middle-aged widow evokes memories of her kindness when Florence was a servant. Left wealthy by her husband, this lady died a pauper, beggared within a few months, how and by whom, Florence does not know. The widow’s legal executor isn’t interested and the police have other concerns. Lacking close family, she’ll be soon forgotten.

But not by Florence. Someone was responsible and there must be retribution. And getting justice will demand impersonation, guile and courage.

Florence doesn’t hesitate to investigate blackmail and fraud in fashionable London. But a single wrong decision in circumstances far removed from that world plunges her into an ever-deepening morass, where loyalty to her country and to seamen who served with her husband raises terrifying dilemmas. Old friends support her but old allies who offer help may have different, even sinister, agendas. Higher stakes are involved than she had ever anticipated. In a time of shifting international alliances, in which not all the enemies she faces are British, she can be little more than a pawn. And pawns are often sacrificed . . .

Britannia’s Morass, plays out against a backdrop of poverty and opulence, of courtroom drama and French luxury, of subterfuge, espionage and danger.

———-

To be published in paperback and Kindle on 12th December 2020.
Pre-order the Kindle now at a reduced price of $2.99 (US) and £1.99 (UK)

 

Alison Morton is the author of Roma Nova thrillers –  INCEPTIO, CARINA (novella), PERFIDITAS, SUCCESSIO,  AURELIA, NEXUS (novella), INSURRECTIO  and RETALIO,  and ROMA NOVA EXTRA, a collection of short stories.  Audiobooks are available for four of the series.

Find out more about Roma Nova, its origins, stories and heroines… Download ‘Welcome to Roma Nova’, a FREE eBook, as a thank you gift when you sign up to Alison’s monthly email newsletter. You’ll also be among the first to know about news and book progress before everybody else, and take part in giveaways.

E M Powell: How to write a mystery

This week’s guest is the wonderful E M Powell whose historical thriller and medieval mystery Fifth Knight and Stanton & Barling novels have been #1 Amazon and Bild bestsellers. The third Stanton & Barling mystery, ‘The Canterbury Murders’, will be released in November 2020.

Born and raised in the Republic of Ireland into the family of Michael Collins (the legendary revolutionary and founder of the Irish Free State), she lives in northwest England with her husband, daughter and a Facebook-friendly dog. She’s represented by Josh Getzler at HG Literary.

We met many years ago at a Historical Novel Society conference and she was kind enough to say some lovely things about INSURRECTIO, “Morton’s thrilling world-building is a masterclass in alternate history. You don’t just believe her version – you live every twist and turn.” 

Over to E M to tell us the secrets of writing a mystery…

As with so much writing craft advice, you can do an Internet search of the topic and find a variety of approaches that can be almost overwhelming. So it is with advice on writing a mystery.

I can only share what works for me and my medieval Stanton and Barling series. It’s important to note that the while the medieval setting is a key component in my books, the process I’m setting out here can be applied to any era or setting. Also, all writers are magpies. Even if you don’t find every point of use, you may find bits and pieces that are worth taking away.  (Oh, how true!)

Write it Backwards

The core questions in any mystery are who killed this person and why. This is the first one I ask myself and the first one I answer. Then I work back from there.  Our investigator ultimately finds out in the course of the novel. But I will have known from page one.

A Story Never Told

I first write a story –The Secret Plot – that the reader is not going to find on the page. Now before everyone abandons all hope of wisdom, let me explain.

In any intriguing mystery, the reader does not know what’s going on. Now, I do know some writers who also do not know what is going on when they’re writing their mysteries. I am a control freak, so that approach brings me out in hives. I like to plan my mystery down to the very last detail, twist and turn.

In order to do that, I first of all need to know what my perpetrator is doing. I need to know everything about them, every act they perform and that nobody else knows about. So I write the story as if I am in the perpetrator’s head and world. The novel is the story of the uncovering of those unsavoury deeds.

First Things First, AKA Begin before the Beginning

I also need to start the story in advance of page one of the actual novel. This is part of the Secret Plot. What brings perpetrator and victim together, how and when the victim is dispatched. That brings us to the issue of throwing the body on the floor. it’s always a good to have your first or only victim quickly found.

The Secret Plot is primarily about how the perpetrator carries out the murders and why. Secrecy is key in any mystery and not just with regard to the perpetrator. In order for the reader to stay engaged, there needs to be a range of suspects. Just as important, each of those suspects should have a secret. The investigator can find out those secrets or they can be shared with the reader. What’s important to establish is that everyone is a lying liar who lies. The challenge for the investigator and indeed for the reader is to discover who is lying about killing the victim. I’ll return to this point in a moment. But first let’s have a look at our investigator.

Call the Cops – or Whoever

Successful mysteries and mystery series are those which have investigators who readers root for. They should not be perfect individuals and it helps if they are deeply flawed. Without a central investigator to care about, readers may persist to see the overall solving of the crime but they are unlikely to care. If they care, they want their investigator to succeed. That investigator, or in my case, my investigators, Stanton and Barling, should have backstories and lives that existed long before page one. Investigators that readers care about will bring readers back to subsequent books.

Mind: Blown

You’ve done work, a lot of work. You’ve come up with the protagonist. Or even a team of protagonists. You have a victim or victims. You know exactly how when and where the murders took place. You know why they took place. You have a team of suspects for your investigations to investigate.

Now brace yourself: you still may yet not have a single word of your novel on the page. And that does not matter. The fun starts here.

When I say fun, I would probably more accurately describe it as mental gymnastics of the most exercising kind. Because in/on any given sentence, paragraph or page, or within an exchange of dialogue, you have to keep the following in your head:

  1. Who knows what?
  2. Who doesn’t know what?
  3. Who is trying to keep what a secret?
  4. Who learns what when?
  5. What does the reader know?
  6. What doesn’t the reader know?
  7. Where is everybody?

And just as you have all of those pieces assembled in your head and are picking your way through the scene carefully and successfully, all it takes is the arrival of a courier with a package or a dog at your knee who is determined to let you know there’s a bluebottle in the kitchen and the whole thing is blown apart again.

One of the biggest helps to keeping yourself sane or, even worse, to keep yourself from blurting out an important plot point by accident, is writing software that keeps all the plates spinning. I personally have found Scrivener to be a life saver in terms of keeping all of my thoughts in one place as well as being able to cross reference scenes to keep track of all the different threads.

Rabbits and Hats

I did mention fun and writing a mystery really is. There is no greater pleasure to be had than reading reviews afterwards or getting a message from a reader when they say the end was a shock/it was surprising/they had no idea I’ll stop. It’s wonderful because you knew every single detail and put clues aplenty in there and yet people still didn’t guess. You pulled the rabbit out of the hat. I’m not a magician. But honestly? That feeling really is magic. You should give it a try.

A masterclass in mystery writing. I read this, nodding my head at every sentence. I’m a big fan of spreadsheets for tracking 1.-7. but goodness, you do need to keep a firm grip on the plot. But as E M says, writing mysteries (and thrillers) is enormous fun.

Connect with E M Powell

Website: www.empowell.com
Blog: http://www.empowell.blogspot.co.uk/
Facebook: www.facebook.com/empowellauthor
Twitter: https://twitter.com/empowellauthor    @empowellauthor

Discover the latest E M Powell mystery

A fire-ravaged cathedral. An ungodly murder.

Easter, 1177. Canterbury Cathedral, home to the tomb of martyr Saint Thomas Becket, bears the wounds of a terrible fire. Benedict, prior of the great church, leads its rebuilding. But horror interrupts the work. One of the stonemasons is found viciously murdered, the dead man’s face disfigured by a shocking wound.

When King’s clerk Aelred Barling and his assistant, Hugo Stanton, arrive on pilgrimage to the tomb, the prior orders them to investigate the unholy crime.

But the killer soon claims another victim–and another. As turmoil embroils the congregation, the pair of sleuths face urgent pressure to find a connection between the killings.

With panic on the rise, can Barling and Stanton catch the culprit before evil prevails again—and stop it before it comes for them?

THE CANTERBURY MURDERS is the third book in E.M. Powell’s Stanton and Barling medieval murder mystery series. Combining intricate plots, shocking twists and a winning–if unlikely–pair of investigators, this series is perfect for fans of Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael or C. J. Sansom’s Shardlake.

Available now on Amazon: http://mybook.to/TheCanterburyMurders

 

Alison Morton is the author of Roma Nova thrillers –  INCEPTIO, CARINA (novella), PERFIDITAS, SUCCESSIO,  AURELIA, NEXUS (novella), INSURRECTIO  and RETALIO,  and ROMA NOVA EXTRA, a collection of short stories.  Audiobooks are available for four of the series.

Find out more about Roma Nova, its origins, stories and heroines… Download ‘Welcome to Alison Morton’s Thriller Worlds’, a FREE eBook, as a thank you gift when you sign up to Alison’s monthly email newsletter. You’ll also be among the first to know about news and book progress before everybody else, and take part in giveaways.

Sounds and silence

Bringing in the senses to our writing adds a layer of richness and anchors the setting. It also grounds the character in that setting. It can emphasise an awkward gap in actions between characters, or provide a dialogue beat that isn’t “he said/she said”.

But what sounds could you bring in? Surely most people’s lives don’t have a lot of sound apart from the odd car, airplane overhead or kids shouting?

I live near a small village in France and we are still in lockdown at the moment, so you’d think it would be really quiet and peaceful with no sounds interrupting my thoughts, deeds and writing. I ran an experiment to test this. I reckoned I’d note down half a dozen sounds max then get on with my day.

Was I wrong!

Here are a few from this morning…

Gurgle of the central heating  boiler and pump*
Soft hum of traffic on the main road right at the end of our road*
The fridge burbling in the kitchen*
Birds chirruping outside*
The shriek of a crow*
The neighbour’s gate clanging shut as he goes out for his morning walk.
Footsteps on tiled floors
The loo flushing
The swish of nets brushed along the curtain rails to get to the window handles.
Click of metal against wood of the window handles twisting and opening, then clicking and snapping as they are closed.
The window shutter catches creaking, then un-oiled shutter hinges squeaking followed by the shutter leaves clattering against the outside walls and the retaining hasps grating against the wood.*

Kettle boiling for the first morning cup of tea
Door handles opening
Light switch clicked on
Shower water falling and the bathroom ventilator thrumming*
Kitchen tap running hard, battering down into the sink
Coffee machine gurgling in ever rising tones*
Fridge door sucking open, then squelching shut
Cereal cascading into a bowl
Milk poured on top
The jangling inside the cutlery drawer as it’s opened

All this and it isn’t even 8 o’clock yet! Nor has the neighbour got his leaf sweeper out.

Looking at this list, I realise I have used those marked with an asterisk* in my Roma Nova novels. 🙂 How strange.

When you’re looking for a noise to fill or interrupt an action in your books, listen to what’s going on around you. You’d be surprised what you can use!

 

Alison Morton is the author of Roma Nova thrillers –  INCEPTIO, CARINA (novella), PERFIDITAS, SUCCESSIO,  AURELIA, NEXUS (novella), INSURRECTIO  and RETALIO,  and ROMA NOVA EXTRA, a collection of short stories.  Audiobooks are available for four of the series.

Find out more about Roma Nova, its origins, stories and heroines… Download ‘Welcome to Roma Nova’, a FREE eBook, as a thank you gift when you sign up to Alison’s monthly email newsletter. You’ll also be among the first to know about news and book progress before everybody else, and take part in giveaways.